The Program

The Art Major at Earlham College is unusual because it emphasizes both contemporary craft media, such as ceramics, metalsmithing and fiber art, and more traditional media, such as drawing, painting and photography. The program also offers a range of options for work in art history and curatorial practices.

Earlham's Art Program requires no prerequisites for introductory courses, and both majors and non-majors are welcome. Each student majoring in Art chooses an area of focus, which consists of at least four courses in one of the following: ceramics, drawing, art history, metalsmithing, painting, photography and fibers. In addition to building competency in a focus, each student also takes Art: Context and Meaning — Part One (ART 115), Art: Context and Meaning — Part Two (ART 116) Making Art: Content, Form and Expression (ART 250), art history and a course in theatre, music or film.

All Art majors complete an intensive Senior Project in their area of focus, known as a Senior Capstone Experience. These projects, planned in consultation with department faculty, customarily lead to participation in a senior art exhibition in Leeds and Ronald Galleries or to the presentation of a research paper, the curation of an exhibition, completion of a community arts project or a similar public presentation appropriate to the project.

Each Art major completes an internship as well. The broad range of options for an internship includes work in a museum, apprenticing with an artist in a studio, participating in an intensive off-campus workshop, or working in a community arts program. Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the Great Lakes Colleges Association's New York Arts Program, which is an opportunity to spend a semester in New York City as an apprentice to an artist — some of them internationally known — or work as an intern in a major museum or gallery.

Among the resources available for art students are a large drawing and painting studio; a ceramics studio and a kiln building with a variety of electric, gas and wood-fired kilns; a darkroom; well-equipped metals and weaving studios; Leeds Gallery, an art exhibition space in Runyan Center; and Ronald Gallery in Lilly Library, which displays pieces from Earlham's Permanent Collection and other artists. Students in art classes often enjoy opportunities to participate in field trips to regional museums and sites. The Art Department also offers many intensive courses both on and off campus during May Term.

The studio art faculty members are all working artists who make and exhibit their own art in addition to teaching. Our art historian curates many exhibits from the College's Art Collection throughout the year in Ronald Gallery in Lilly Library.

Recent graduates from Earlham include students in a wide variety of excellent graduate programs. Many others have gone directly into the world of arts, working in their own creative studios or completing apprenticeships with professional artists. Two of our recent graduates received the Thomas J. Watson Foundation Fellowship. Each spent a year studying a subject of their own design.

General Education Requirements

Students may take courses in the Art Department to fulfill either or both parts of The Arts General Education Requirement: students are required to complete either (a) one course (of at least 3 credits) which examines arts from an historical, critical or theoretical perspective, and one course (of at least 1 credit) of applied theatre, studio art or applied music; or (b) a beginning and an advanced studio art course in the same medium.

The Department offers one course that fulfills the Domestic component of the Diversity Requirement, ART 312, and six courses that fulfill the International component of this requirement, ART 115, 116, 210, 385, 410 and 412.

The Department offers occasional Earlham Seminars.

The Major

Earlham's Art Major offers a unique opportunity to combine both applied arts and the emphasis on reading and writing customary at a liberal arts college. As a result, each Art major develops a broad range of skills, culminating in the Senior Capstone, which serves as the comprehensive gauge of the student's experience.

Requirements for the Art Major with Studio Emphasis

  • ART 250 Making Art: Content, Form and Expression
  • Two studio courses, one each in a two-dimensional and three-dimensional medium. One of these can be in the area of focus. Studio offerings include classes in (two-dimensional) Drawing, Painting, Photography and Fibers, and (three-dimensional) Ceramics and Metals.
  • Four Art History courses which must include ART 115 Art: Context and Meaning — Part One, ART 116 Art: Context and Meaning — Part Two, and either ART 210 History of Craft or ART 211 20th Century Art, plus a fourth course of ther student's choosing. Students are encouraged to take both ART 210 and 211 when possible.
  • At least three academic or applied credits in Music, Theatre and/or Film (including music lessons taken for credit)
  • At least four courses (12 credits) in one area of focus (e.g., Ceramics)
  • Internship or apprenticeship experience
  • ART 487 Senior Project, Fall Semester (1 credit)
  • ART 488 Senior Capstone Experience, Spring Semester (3 credits)

Requirements for the Art Major with Art History Emphasis

  • ART 115 Art: Context and Meaning — Part One, and ART 116 Art: Context and Meaning — Part Two
  • Either ART 210 History of Craft or ART 211 20th Century Art
  • Four additional Art History courses
  • Three Studio Art courses (ART 250 Making Art: Content, Form and Expression, one 2D and one 3D)
  • An internship
  • At least three academic or applied credits in Music, Theatre and/or Film (including music lessons taken for credit)
  • ART 487 Senior Project, Fall Semester (1 credit)
  • ART 488 Senior Capstone Experience, Spring Semester (3 credits)

The Minor

Requirements for an Art History Minor

  • At least six Art History courses, including ART 115 Art: Context and Meaning — Part One, ART 116 Art: Context and Meaning — Part Two, either ART 210 History of Craft or ART 211 20th Century Art, and three other courses.
  • One studio art course.

* Key

Courses that fulfill
General Education Requirements:

  • (A-AP) = Arts - Applied
  • (A-TH) = Arts - Theoretical/Historical
  • (A-AR) = Analytical - Abstract Reasoning
  • (A-QR) = Analytical - Quantitative
  • (D-D) = Diversity - Domestic
  • (D-I) = Diversity - International
  • (D-L) = Diversity - Language
  • (ES) = Earlham Seminar
  • (IE) = Immersive Experience
  • (RCH) = Research
  • (SI) = Scientific Inquiry
  • (W) = Wellness
  • (WI) = Writing Intensive
  • (AY) = Offered in Alternative Year

*ART 115 ART: CONTEXT AND MEANING (3 credits) 
Presents a thematic introduction of world architecture and art from prehistoric times to the Gothic period. Draws from a variety of academic disciplines and is designed to increase appreciation and understanding of art as related to its cultural context. Develops critical thinking and analytical skills in response to visual experience. (A-TH, D-I)

*ART 116 ART: CONTEXT AND MEANING — PART TWO (3 credits) 
Presents an introduction of world architecture and art from the Renaissance to the present. Draws from a variety of academic disciplines and is designed to increase appreciation and understanding of art as it relates to its cultural context. Develops critical thinking and analytical skills in response to visual experience. Also listed as MUSE 116. (A-TH, D-I)

*ART 150 EARLHAM SEMINAR (4 credits)
For first-year students when offered. Topics vary. (ES)

*ART 200 CERAMICS I (3 credits)
Introduction to ceramic processes and techniques, including a range of forming methods from hand-building through wheel work, a variety of surface treatments and firing methods. Taught through a series of projects that incorporate personal research along with technical problems, readings and discussions, demonstrations and group critiques of completed assignments. (A-AP)

*ART 201 CERAMICS I WORKSHOP (3 credits)
Intensive three-week experience in ceramics, meeting all day each day. Intended as an introductory experience for those with little or no previous experience in ceramics. Not an exact equivalent for the full semester course, ART 200, but very similar in range and content. May Term. (A-AP)

*ART 202 ART CLOTH (3 credits)
An introduction to dyeing techniques such as batik and shibori, along with fabric piecing and embellishment. Studio work will include extensive experimentation with techniques as well as individual projects to develop both technical and aesthetic skills. Students also participate in lectures and discussions, and the course will be enriched by explorations into multicultural history and traditions of fabric art.

*ART 205 DRAWING I (3 credits)
Introduces students to the drawing process. Students work from observation and from imagination in creating works in a variety of media and methods that express an understanding of light, form and space. An excellent point of departure for those interested in painting. Students without any prior experience should take Drawing I before Painting I. (A-AP)

*ART 206 DRAWING I WORKSHOP
Intensive three-week introduction to the drawing process. Students work from observation and from imagination in creating works in a variety of media and methods that express an understanding of light, form and space. This course is an excellent point of departure for those interested in painting. Not an exact equivalent for the full semester course, ART 205, but similar in range and content. (A-AP)

*ART 210 HISTORY OF CRAFT (3 credits)
An examination of the history of craft from ancient times to the present. Explores indigenous craft and contemporary craft theory as related to the fine arts. (D-I) (AY)

*ART 211 20TH CENTURY ART (3 credits)
A broad survey that begins by setting the groundwork for art of the 20th century with a discussion of the late 19th century artistic movements of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, and the forces that lured artists away from the confines of academic painting. Explores the social and political forces, as well as the theoretical discourses that frame the major modern and post-modern art movements of the 20th century. Includes Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. (A-TH) (AY)

*ART 220 METALS I (3 credits)
An introduction to the creative design of three-dimensional form as applied to jewelry, hollowware and small sculptural objects. Students explore the creative use of materials and techniques, advance their design vocabulary and gain a deeper understanding of art in historical, social and cultural contexts. Students draw upon personal interests and experiences to integrate appreciation and understanding of art into their lives. (A-AP)

*ART 225 PAINTING I (3 credits)
Introduction to oil painting covering all elements of the process from preparing a canvas to mixing paint. Includes contemporary and traditional genres with an emphasis placed personal research. Familiarity with drawing recommended. (A-AP)

*ART 235 PHOTOGRAPHY I (3 credits)
Students learn camera operation, experimenting with the ways different shutter speeds and apertures change a photograph; and how to develop film and print their own photographs in a chemical darkroom, while exploring the aesthetic results of their choices. Introduces the history of photography and fundamentals of art criticism. Explores the creative use of photography as a means of personal expression through a variety of projects. Many opportunities to address the class about your own photographs and to participate in lively group discussions on the work of others. Also listed as JNLM 235. (A-AP)

*ART 245 WEAVING I (3 credits)
An introduction to the structure and design of weaves, fiber dyeing, the production of woven items in a variety of fibers, and the history and traditions of weaving in both western and non-western cultures. Students design and weave a series of required and individual projects to develop both technical and aesthetic textile skills. Students also participate in lectures, discussions and research. (A-AP)

*ART 246 WEAVING I WORKSHOP (3 credits)
Intensive three-week introduction to the structure and design of weaves, fiber dyeing, the production of woven items in a variety of fibers, and the history and traditions of weaving in both western and non-western cultures. Students design and weave a series of required and individual projects to develop both technical and aesthetic textile skills. Students also participate in lectures, discussions and research. May Term. (A-AP)

ART 250 MAKING ART: CONTENT, FORM AND EXPRESSION (3 credits) 
Introduction to the context and content of contemporary art making, formal elements of visual arts, including composition, color and design. Emphasis is placed on articulating ideas and critiquing works of art. Intended for Art majors who should take this class during the Sophomore year.

*ART 300 CERAMICS II (3 credits)
Intermediate level experience in ceramics, which requires students to define a focus for their own work and pursue that direction in the studio. Work as a class includes readings, lectures, demonstrations and discussions covering technical issues, learning to load and fire the kilns, experiments in glaze formulation, research on history and aesthetics of ceramics, and frequent group critiques of other students' work. Prerequisite: ART 200 or 201. (A-AP)

*ART 301, 302 CERAMICS II WORKSHOP (3 credits)
Intensive three-week experience in ceramics, meeting all day each day. Studio work for students at the intermediate or advanced level, pursuing largely individualized directions and research. May Term. Prerequisite: ART 200 or 201. May be repeated for credit. (A-AP)

*ART 303 ART CLOTH II (3 credits)
Students in this course will continue their exploration of cloth and fiber as a medium for artistic expression. Advanced work in dyeing, embellishment and piecing, as well as the making of 3-dimensional forms. Particular attention will be paid to the work of contemporary fiber artists. (A-TH)

*ART 305 DRAWING II (3 credits)
Life Drawing. Builds upon an understanding of light, form and space as students work to develop facility, through the study and expression of the human form. While the primary medium is charcoal, students are introduced to a variety of materials from which a portfolio is produced. Prerequisite: ART 205. (A-AP)

*ART 312 ART OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST (3 credits)
Examines the history of art from the American Southwest beginning with rock art. Cultures examined include the Anasazi, Hohokam, Mimbres, Zuni, Hopi and their architecture, painting and sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 115, 210, 211 or another Art History course approved by the instructor. (A-TH, D-D) (AY)

*ART 320 METALS II (3 credits)
Intermediate course in the design and creation of metal art objects. Building on the foundation laid in Metals I, students execute a series of projects of ascending complexity both technically and conceptually. These projects broaden metalworking skills, advance design vocabulary and deepen understanding of art in historical, social and cultural contexts. Emphasizes exploring the plasticity of metal through forging, raising, stretching and hydraulic die forming. Prerequisite: ART 220. (A-AP)

*ART 321 METALS II: MOKUME GANE (3 credits)
Explores the same issues of plasticity through the lens of a traditional Japanese metalsmithing technique that translates to "wood grained metal." The technique involves laminating alternate layers of different colored metals through the process of diffusion in which the metals bond to each other molecularly and essentially become one piece of metal. This material is then carved to reveal the alternating layers of metal and produce "wood grain" patterns. May Term. Prerequisite: ART 220. (A-AP)

*ART 325 PAINTING II (3 credits)
Continues the exploration of the personal and historical nature of painting while investigating other media (e.g., encaustic), skills (e.g., hand-made stretchers and frames), community engagement, and preparing a cohesive body of work for a final critique. Prerequisite: ART 225. (A-AP)

*ART 333 HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAHY (3 credits)
Presents the history and interpretation of photography — as a scientific discovery and as an art form — from its beginnings in Western Europe in 1839 to present-day practice around the world. The course is designed to increase appreciation and understanding of photographic art as it relates to its cultural context and to develop critical thinking and analytical skills in response to visual experience. Attention will be given to geographic areas traditionally ignored in photography survey courses, such as the development of photography on the African and Asian continents. Prerequisite: ART 115, ART 116, ART 211, ART/JNLM 235 or the consent of the instructor.

*ART 335 PHOTOGRAPHY II (3 credits)
Advances skills gained in Photography I, with an increased emphasis on conceptual issues and aesthetic content, art theory and art criticism, and how one enters "the art world." One segment combines the best of the old and the new as students learn an historic, non-silver process by coating their own paper to make blue and white cyanotypes or Van Dyke browns with enlarged negatives created digitally with a scanner and Photoshop. Prerequisite: ART 235. Also listed as JNLM 335. (A-AP)

*ART 339 LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP (3 credits)
Intended for students who have learned the basics of operating a camera, developing their own black and white film and printing photographs, and who are ready to improve both their technical skills and the artistic content of their work. Intensive three-week exploration of one of the medium's oldest genres: the landscape. Course's primary activity is the taking of photographs out-of-doors and the review and discussion of them through group critiques. Explores examples of landscape photographs by various photographers and discusses the genre's progression from Pictorialism and the Photo Secessionist movement to Modernism and Postmodernism. May Term. Prerequisite: ART 235. (A-AP) (AY)

ART 340 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP (3 credits)
Intended for students who have learned the basics of operating a camera, developing their own black and white film, and printing photographs, and who are ready to improve both their technical skills and the artistic content of their work. This intensive three-week workshop meets all day, every weekday, as students pursue variety of photographic projects in the studio, lab and outdoors. Individual work supplemented with lectures, slide shows and group critiques. May Term. Prerequisite: ART 235. (A-AP) (AY)

*ART 345 WEAVING II (3 credits)
Further experience in weaving, dyeing and textile design. Students pursue individual directions in their work. Includes readings, discussions, research on contemporary weaving, the role of the handmade in the 21st century, and frequent group critiques of student work. Prerequisite: ART 245. (A-AP)

*ART 385 ART OF THE AMERICAS (3 credits)
Lecture course surveying the arts produced by the major civilizations of South America, Mesoamerica and North America from the second millennia B.C. until contact with Europeans in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Designed to increase students' understanding and appreciation of the accomplishments of people in the pre-contact world as relates to cultural context. Prerequisite: ART 115, 210, 211 or another art history course approved by the instructor. (A-TH, D-I) (AY)

ART 400 CERAMICS III (3 credits)
An advanced level studio experience, intended for students who have completed at least two semesters of work in ceramics. Parallels the class in Ceramics II, with students pursuing similar work on a more advanced level and defining more advanced individualized studio projects and subjects for research. Prerequisite: ART 300.

ART 401 CERAMICS IV (3 credits)
Students advance skills gained in ART 400. Prerequisite: ART 400.

ART 405 DRAWING III (3 credits)
Life Drawing. Builds upon an understanding of light, form and space as students work to develop facility through the study and expression of the human form. While the primary medium is charcoal, students are introduced to a variety of materials from which a portfolio is produced. Prerequisite: ART 305.

ART 406 DRAWING IV (3 credits)
Students advance skills gained in ART 405. Prerequisite: ART 405.

*ART 410 AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ART (3 credits)
Presents the history and interpretation of art produced by the indigenous peoples of Australia from prehistoric times to the present. Considers both the historical development of Aboriginal art and the culturally specific information conveyed through art. Examines the relationship of art to contemporary Aboriginal politics of race and social equality. Prerequisite: ART 115, 210, 211 or another Art History course approved by the instructor. (A-TH, D-I) (AY)

*ART 412 THE ARTS OF AFRICA (3 credits)
A survey of the arts produced by the major civilizations of the African continent beginning in Paleolithic times and continuing to the present. Includes discussion of painting, sculpture, textiles, metalwork and architecture. Designed to increase students' understanding and appreciation of the artistic accomplishments of the diverse people of the African world as related to cultural context. Addresses the place of African art within the discourse of authenticity, museums and the art market. Prerequisite: ART 115, 210, 211 or another Art History course approved by the instructor. (A-TH, D-I) (AY)

ART 420 METALS III (3 credits)
An advanced course in Metals for those wishing to explore more challenging problems in both historical and contemporary techniques. At this level, students are assigned projects in areas of their highest interest and promise. Prerequisite: ART 320.

ART 421 METALS IV (3 credits)
Students advance skills gained in ART 420. Prerequisite: ART 420.

ART 425 PAINTING III (3 credits)
Continues the exploration of the personal and historical nature of painting while investigating other media (e.g., tempera), skills (e.g., presenting and writing about the work), and preparing a cohesive body of work for a final critique. Prerequisite: ART 325.

ART 426 PAINTING IV (3 credits)
Students advance skills gained in ART 425. Prerequisite: ART 425.

ART 435 PHOTOGRAPHY III (3 credits)
Builds upon skills gained in Photography II and may be taught in conjunction with that course, with students pursuing similar work on a more advanced level. Prerequisite: ART 335.

ART 445 WEAVING III (3 credits)
Advanced work in weaving, dyeing and textile design. Parallels the Weaving II class, with students pursuing similar work on a more advanced level and defining individualized studio projects and subjects for research. Prerequisite: ART 345.

ART 446 WEAVING IV (3 credits)
Students advance skills gained in ART 445. Prerequisite: ART 445.

ART 447 PHOTOGRAPHY IV (3 credits)
May be taught in conjunction with Photography II and III. Emphasizes the further development of the student's self-expression through the creation of a cohesive portfolio of exhibition-quality art work. Prerequisite: ART 437.

ART 475 INDIVIDUAL STUDIO EXPERIENCE (1-3 credits)
Advanced, intensive studio work, proposed to and planned with a member of the art faculty.

ART 481 INTERNSHIP (1-3 credits)

ART 482 SPECIAL TOPICS (3 credits)
Selected topics determined by the instructor for upper-level study. Recent topics include: Art Since 1967; Matisse, Picasso and Early Modernism, and Renaissance & Baroque seminar. Prerequisite: At least one other Art History course or consent of the instructor.

ART 483 TEACHING ASSISTANTS (1-3 credits)

ART 484 FORD/KNIGHT PROJECT (1-4 credits)
Collaborative research with faculty funded by the Ford/Knight Program. Recent topics include: Ceremonial Maces, Quaker Art, Kiln Design, Meetinghouse Photography, West African Textiles and Kilim Weaving.

ART 485 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)
Investigation of a specific topic conceived and planned by the student in consultation with a faculty adviser in studio art or art history.

ART 487 SENIOR PROJECT (1 credit)
Art majors are strongly encouraged to register for this course during the Fall Semester of their senior year in preparation for their Senior Capstone Experience. Departmental approval required.

ART 488 SENIOR CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 credits)
Students should register for Senior Capstone Experience during the Spring Semester of their final year. Departmental approval required.

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Earlham College, an independent, residential college, aspires to provide the highest-quality undergraduate education in the liberal arts, including the sciences, shaped by the distinctive perspectives of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).

Earlham College
801 National Road West
Richmond, Indiana
47374-4095
1-765-983-1200 — Main Switchboard
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