The Program

Earlham's Business and Nonprofit Management program prepares students with leadership skills effective in a multicultural world. In small classes where the student body is highly diverse, Management majors develop rigorous analytical skills, participate in collaborative team decision-making and practice new leadership styles. On campus, Management students are encouraged to participate in student organizations, College committees and community service activities where they develop leadership and organizational skills. Off campus, hands-on internships provide them with real-world experience. After graduation students assume leadership positions in various jobs, whether in regional or international businesses, scientific laboratories, social service agencies, international organizations, or arts councils and museums.

Earlham graduates have been admitted to MBA programs of recognized quality. Since the top graduate programs now require several years of work experience before admission, our Center for Career Education staff work with students to identify appropriate positions for their interests and abilities when they graduate.

General Education Requirements

The Program offers 10 courses that fulfill General Education Requirements: two courses that meet the Abstract Reasoning component of the Analytical Reasoning Requirement — MGMT 101 and 103, one course that meets the Quantitative Reasoning component of the Analytical Reasoning Requirement — MGMT 120, one course that meet the Domestic component of the Perspectives in Diversity Requirement — MGMT 343, and six courses that meet the International component of the Perspectives in Diversity Requirement — MGMT 321, 372, 373, 376, 377 and 379.

The Major

Students are encouraged to begin the Major during the first or second year. This provides flexibility in the student’s schedule to participate in an off-campus program and to develop multinational professional networks among other students in the Program.

The Core Plus Four

Students majoring in Business and Nonprofit Management must complete nine core courses and four additional upper-level MGMT courses.

The Core:

  • MGMT 101 Introduction to Macroeconomics OR
    MGMT 103 Introduction to Microeconomics
  • MGMT 120 Elementary Statistics OR
    MGMT 345 Statistics for Economics
  • MGMT 200 Financial Accounting
  • MGMT 203 Introduction to Human Behavior in Organizations
  • MGMT 343 Conflict Resolution
  • MGMT 334 Strategic Analysis and Action
  • MGMT 481 An internship in the U.S. or another country
  • MGMT 381 Field Experience Seminar (can be completed on the Philadelphia program)
  • MGMT 488 Senior Capstone Experience

Plus four:

Majors take a minimum of four more upper-level Management courses. One of these four will focus on public policy and or relationships among government, business and/or nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).

The Minor

Earlham graduates, whatever their majors, frequently pursue careers that move them into management positions. By taking Business and Nonprofit Management as a minor, students in any major can develop an understanding of how to work and lead in an organization.

Students minoring in Business and Nonprofit Management must complete these courses:

  • MGMT 200 Financial Accounting
  • MGMT 203 Introduction to Human Behavior in Organizations
  • MGMT 334 Strategic Analysis and Action
  • MGMT 343 Conflict Resolution
  • One additional upper-level MGMT course.

* Key

Courses that fulfill
General Education Requirements:

  • (A-AP) = Arts - Applied
  • (A-TH) = Arts - Theoretical/Historical
  • (A-AR) = Analytical - Abstract Reasoning
  • (A-QR) = Analytical - Quantitative
  • (D-D) = Diversity - Domestic
  • (D-I) = Diversity - International
  • (D-L) = Diversity - Language
  • (ES) = Earlham Seminar
  • (IP) = Interpretive Practices
  • (SI) = Scientific Inquiry
  • (W) = Wellness
  • (WI) = Writing Intensive
  • (AY) = Offered in Alternative Year

*MGMT 101 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS: MACRO AND GLOBALIZATION (4 credits)
An introduction to mainstream, political, economic and ethical perspectives of macro economic processes at the domestic and global level. Topics include aggregate economic measures, income determination, macro policy, international trade and finance, and international economic organizations like the World Bank, IMF and WTO. Also listed as ECON 101 and PAGS 101. (A-AR)

*MGMT 103 INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS: MICRO AND INSTITUTIONS (4 credits)
An introduction to the theory of individual economic behavior, markets and the microeconomic analysis of institutions. Topics include the theory of the consumer, the theory of the firm, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failures and the role of governments in microeconomic affairs. Also listed as ECON 103 and INST 103. (A-AR)

*MGMT 120 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3 credits)
Topics include exploratory data analysis; measures of central tendency, dispersion and correlation; nonparametric methods; confidence intervals; hypothesis tests; and the design of statistical studies. Also listed as MATH 120. (A-QR)

MGMT 200 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3 credits)
An introduction to the construction and interpretation of financial statements, valuation of assets, financial ratios analysis, and the construction and use of budgets for decision making.

MGMT 203 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS (3 credits)
In what type of organization do you want to work for your internship or career? What are the differences among businesses, government agencies and nonprofit organizations? Investigates organizations from different perspectives and levels of analysis. Appropriate for second semester first-year students, sophomores and juniors. Prerequisite: ESEM 150 Earlham Seminar.

MGMT 206 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the structure and use of information systems in organizations. An information system collects, processes, and disseminates information in order to provide feedback and support for organizational functions. Many organizations today rely on information systems to help achieve organizational goals and mission. This course will give students an understanding of technology within organizations, the role and application of information systems, their limitations and benefits, and how they may impact stakeholders. Prerequisite: completion or concurrent registration in MGMT 203.

*MGMT 321 NONPROFITS IN CIVIL SOCIETY (3 credits)
This course takes a comparative look at the development of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in developing or emerging economies and states. The effect of international NGOs and other external funding sources on local organizations and of local organizations on the external organizations is considered. The course considers the design of strategies for alleviation of poverty and the effect of class on NGO organization and beneficiary organization. Provides experience in grant writing and identification of appropriate funding sources. Prerequisite: MGMT 203 or consent of the instructor. (D-I) (AY)

*MGMT 322 GLOBAL CHANGE I: CLIMATE POLICY (3 credits)
The first in a two-course sequence on global change. Examines the climate crisis, providing a multidisciplinary examination of the anthropogenic causes of climate change, the potential impacts on human society, and potential mitigation strategies (e.g., tax policy, sustainability efforts, urban planning, agricultural reform). Also listed as POLS 322. (D-I) (AY)

*MGMT 324 GLOBAL CHANGE II: ENERGY POLICY (3 credits)
The second in a two-course sequence on global change. Examines the energy crises, providing an in-depth consideration of the ongoing economic crisis resulting from the problem and investigating a broad range of technical and policy alternatives to solve the problem. Also listed as POLS 324. (D-I) (AY)

MGMT 330 MONEY AND CAPITAL MARKETS (4 credits) 
An examination of the structure and operations of the commercial banking system and other financial intermediaries including the stock market and markets for other financial assets, theories of predicting the behavior of stock prices, principles of portfolio selection, and the impact of monetary policy and regulatory agencies on financial markets. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or 103. Also listed as ECON 330. (AY)

MGMT 333 MANAGERIAL FINANCE (4 credits) 
Examines the principles governing the acquisition and management of the financial resources of the firm. Special emphasis on determining the cost of capital, optimal capital budgets and capital structure, and dividend policy of the corporation. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 303. Also listed as ECON 333.

MGMT 334 STRATEGIC ANALYSIS AND ACTION (3 credits)
Using case studies of businesses and not-for-profits, examines the broadest and most fundamental questions confronting organizations. Examines principles of internal organization, criteria for selecting among alternative options and the relationship of the organization to its external environment. Explores pricing and promotion of products and services, along with broader social, legal and ethical implications of the organization's activities. Prerequisite: MGMT 200 and 203 or consent of the instructor.

MGMT 341 LABOR ECONOMICS (4 credits) 
An examination of labor, both in the formal labor market, and more generally as human productive activity. Topics include the theories of wage determination, the development and impact of trade unions, and analysis of major legal and economic issues relating to the structure and functioning of labor markets. Special attention to issues of equity, relationship and discrimination in formal labor markets and the household. Prerequisites: MGMT 101 and 103, or consent of the instructor. Also listed as ECON 341.

*MGMT 343 CONFLICT RESOLUTION (3 credits)
Examines the problem of conflict in social theory and practice. Readings introduce types of alternative dispute resolution. Students practice mediation and negotiation skills through simulated conflicts. Race, class and gender perspectives are presented in class activities, readings and films. Also listed as PAGS 343. (D-D)

MGMT 348 INTERNATIONAL TRADE (4 credits) 
Through a combination of theoretical frameworks and real world applications, attempts to develop a broad understanding of micro and macro issues in the area of international economics. Deals with issues related to the logic and critique of free trade, tariffs and quotas, exchange rate determination, balance of payments, open economy macro policy, stabilization policy and the role of international institutions in international trade. Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 103. Also listed as ECON 348 and INST 348. (AY)

MGMT 349 AFTER THE REVOLUTION AND DURING REFORM: COMPARATIVE PUBLIC MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION (3 credits)
Examines key issues in public and development administration in several countries, including reforms after revolutions, decentralization, and privatization, and the challenges of reaching the poor. Compares and contrasts the scope, the political context in which public agencies operate, and management of public organizations in defining and implementing public policy. Prerequisite: MGMT 203 or consent of the instructor. (AY)

*MGMT 372 INTERNATIONAL LAW: SOVEREIGNTY, HUMANITARIAN LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS (4 credits)
Surveys concepts and theories of international law and treaty interpretation, focusing on problems of the international law of war and peace (international humanitarian law), and questions of socio-political justice (human rights). Prerequisites: POLS 107 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as LGST 372, PAGS 372 and POLS 372. (D-I) (AY)

*MGMT 373 INTERNATIONAL LAW: ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (4 credits)
Surveys concepts and theories of international law and treaty interpretation, focusing on environmental problems and policy-making in the global arena. Topics include the emergence of “the environment” as an issue, managing global common property resources, and sustainable trade and development. Prerequisite: POLS 170. Also listed as ENST 373 and POLS 373. (D-I) (AY)

*MGMT 377 POLITICS OF GLOBAL INEQUALITY (3 credits)
Explores the problem of global inequality, its implications for human development and possible solutions. Builds on concepts from International Political Economy and Comparative Politics. Defines inequality and development, and discusses how to measure these phenomena. Explores competing explanations for the existence and persistence of global inequality, and tackles issues important in the developing world. Prerequisite: POLS 104, 105, 107, 170 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as POLS 377. (D-I) (AY)

MGMT 381 FIELD EXPERIENCE SEMINAR (2 credits)
Integrates issues from field experiences with research in social sciences, readings and cases in career development and ethics in preparation for future work settings. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 and 203, completed internship.

MGMT 481 INTERNSHIPS, FIELD STUDIES AND OTHER FIELD EXPERIENCES (1 credit)
Students must complete an internship form approved by a member of the Program faculty before beginning the internship. There are assigned reports to be submitted during the internship.

MGMT 482 SPECIAL TOPICS (3 credits)
Selected topics determined by the instructor for upper-level study.

MGMT 483 TEACHING ASSISTANTS (1-3 credits)

MGMT 484 FORD/KNIGHT RESEARCH PROJECT (1-4 credits)
Collaborative research with faculty funded by the Ford/Knight Program.

MGMT 485 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3 credits)
Students conduct independent research with faculty on topics in Business and Nonprofit Management.

MGMT 488 SENIOR CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 credits)
Examines issues related to organizations, industries, and the socio-cultural, political and economic context in which they operate. Components of the course constitute the comprehensive assessment for the major.

Print Friendly and PDF

Earlham College, an independent, residential college, aspires to provide the highest-quality undergraduate education in the liberal arts, including the sciences, shaped by the distinctive perspectives of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).

Earlham College
801 National Road West
Richmond, Indiana
47374-4095
1-765-983-1200 — Main Switchboard
1-800-EARLHAM (327-5426) — Admissions