The Program

General Education Requirements

The Program offers six courses that meet the International component of the Diversity Requirement, FILM 330, 332, 342, 346, 350 and 356; four courses that meet the Theoretical/Historical component of the Arts Requirement, FILM 215, 252, 342 and 356; two courses that meet the Writing Intensive Requirement FILM 252 and 330.

The Minor

The Minor requires five courses on film, such as:

  • FILM 215 Introduction to Film Studies
  • FILM 252 Philosophy and Film Theory
  • FILM 275 Video Production
  • FILM 300 Topics in Film Studies
    (can be taken more than once with a different topic)
  • FILM 330 Postcolonial Theory
  • FILM 332 Hispanic Film Series/Studies
  • FILM 342 Film Studies and Japanese Cinema
  • FILM 346 Classic and Contemporary German Film
  • FILM 349 National Security Policy Via Film
  • FILM 350 Topics in French (when a film-related topic)

* Key

Courses that fulfill
General Education Requirements:

  • (A-AP) = Arts - Applied
  • (A-TH) = Arts - Theoretical/Historical
  • (A-AR) = Analytical - Abstract Reasoning
  • (A-QR) = Analytical - Quantitative
  • (D-D) = Diversity - Domestic
  • (D-I) = Diversity - International
  • (D-L) = Diversity - Language
  • (ES) = Earlham Seminar
  • (IE) = Immersive Experience
  • (RCH) = Research
  • (SI) = Scientific Inquiry
  • (W) = Wellness
  • (WI) = Writing Intensive
  • (AY) = Offered in Alternative Year

*FILM 215 INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (4 credits)
Introduces film analysis skills that focus on technical details of the cinematic medium, and how they influence narration, character and theme. Highlights important topics in film history and film theory. Prerequisite: Earlham Seminar. (A-TH) Offered once every three years.

FILM 243 ISLAM AND FILM (4 credits)
This course explores Islam as portrayed in selected films, most from regions with a historically significant Muslim population, and some from the West. Through the films and readings students will explore gay and lesbian life in various Muslim countries, women’s roles in Afghanistan under the Taliban, relationships between historically Muslim countries and the West, tensions between Muslim, non-Muslim culture in India and Pakistan, and more. Prerequisite: Earlham Seminar. Also listed as REL 243.

*FILM 252 PHILOSOPHY AND FILM THEORY (4 credits)
Investigates the relationship between philosophical ideas and visual narratives. Examines the philosophical foundations of various theories of film and interprets visual narratives in terms of philosophical ideas. Prerequisite: Earlham Seminar. Also listed as PHIL 252. (A-TH, WI)

FILM 275 VIDEO PRODUCTION (3 credits)
Provides a basic understanding of the theory and technologies of video production. Also looks at the functions of video and television as communication media and social forces. Also listed as THEA 275. (A-AP)

*FILM 299 RELIGION AND CULTURE OF HIP HOP (4 credits)
Bringing to bear written texts, music, film and other media sources, this course explores the definition and moral significance of Hip Hop as a religious and cultural phenomenon within popular culture. Specific issues explored in this course include the syncretism of religious symbols and sensibilities in Hip Hop; the racial, ethnic, sex-gendered, and class dynamics of Hip Hop; as well as the language and aesthetics of Hip Hop. Also listed as AAAS 299 and REL 299. (D-D)

FILM 300 TOPICS IN FILM STUDIES (3-4 credits)
Topics determined by the instructor might consider particular filmmakers or cinematic movements as well as interdisciplinary or thematic concerns. May be taken more than once with different topic. Prerequisite: ENG 207 or FILM 215 or consent of the instructor.

*FILM 330 POSTCOLONIAL THEORY (4 credits)
A study of selected topics in Postcolonial Theory. Investigates the philosophical presuppositions of these topics and the relationship between modern philosophy and European colonialism. Prerequisite: Earlham Seminar and one prior Philosophy course. Also listed as PAGS 330 and PHIL 330. (WI, D-I) (AY)

*FILM 342 JAPANESE CINEMA (3 credits)
A survey of Japanese cinema from early films to anime, comparing the development of Japanese cinema with other national contexts. Develops analytical skills that focus on technical details of films and how they inflect narration, character and theme. Also listed as JPNS 342. (A-TH, D-I)

*FILM 346 CLASSIC AND CONTEMPORARY GERMAN FILM (3 credits)
Examines films in the historical and social contexts from the Expressionist period of the early 1920s to contemporary German cinema. Also looks at cinema as an art form and film style. Also listed as GER 346. (D-I) (AY)

FILM 349 NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY VIA FILM (3 credits)
Examines a collection of contemporary films that seeks to enhance our understanding of real-world politics and major policy debates. Expands the view of movies as entertainment to deepen our understanding of politics, economics and culture. Also discusses the politics of film-making, seeking to understand why filmmakers choose political subjects. Also listed as POLS 349. (AY)

*FILM 350 TOPICS IN FRENCH (3 credits)
Topics vary, as does the focus on European or non-European literatures or cinemas in French. Designed to enable students to begin to engage in serious analysis with an emphasis on critical approaches. Recent topics include: representations of Paris, African cinema, Mandinka literature. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: FREN 222, 301, 303 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as FREN 350. (D-I)

FILM 356 TOPICS IN FILM STUDIES (3 credits)
Studies the development of movies and movie-making in the Hispanic world. Topics vary. Students may take this course more than once with a different topic. Prerequisite: Placement or consent of the instructor. Also listed as SPAN 356. (A-TH, D-I)

FILM 388 VIDEO PRODUCTION II: EDITING (3 credits)
Editing is often seen as the hidden art form in film and video. When it is well done, an audience doesn’t notice. Editing conventions and techniques as well as practice will develop a core set of editing skills in the Final Cut X app. Students will explore “the invisible art” through readings like In the Blink of an Eye, films, and hands-on exercises. Prerequisite: FILM 275 or consent of the instructor. Also listed as THEA 388.

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Earlham College, an independent, residential college, aspires to provide the highest-quality undergraduate education in the liberal arts, including the sciences, shaped by the distinctive perspectives of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers).

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