Rachael Reavis
Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology

Rachael Reavis is a psychologist with a special focus on developmental psychopathology. She regularly involves students in her research projects. These collaborations have led to publications and presentations at scholarly meetings.

Of the connections between research and teaching she says, “as I pursue new avenues of scholarship, I involve students in the process and show them that learning is a life-long process and that I am as much learner as I am teacher. Students in the classroom benefit from passionate and engaged professors who expose students to recent and cutting-edge developments.”

Contact Info

Campus Mail
Drawer 117

Phone
765-983-1235

E-mail
reavira@earlham.edu

Office
305 Landrum Bolling Center

Office Hours
drop in or by appointment

Programs/Departments

  • Psychology

Degrees

  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • M.A., University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • B.A., Connecticut College

Selected Courses:

Two of my favorite courses to teach are Adult Psychopathology (PSYC 220) and Developmental Psychopathology (PSYC 363), which include service-learning components. I regularly teach senior research and introductory courses, including Behavior, Health, & Society (PSYC 116), a course specifically for pre-health students that covers introductory psychology and sociology topics. I also offer research experiences in the Peer Lab every semester.

My research and clinical training were shaped by a developmental psychopathology framework, which emphasizes diverse developmental pathways and the necessity of understanding both normative and non-normative developmental processes. I have an eclectic research program. My main interests are in bullying/peer-victimization, friendship, social cognition, and fixed/growth mindset (how people think about abilities and effort).

Rachael Reavis' ResearchGate Profile

Publications (Undergraduate co-authors are marked by an asterisk.)

Reavis, R., Donohue, L.*, & Upchurch, M.* (in press). Friendship, negative peer experiences, and daily positive and negative mood. Social Development. doi: 10.1111.sode12123  

Reavis, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (2010). Trajectories of peer victimization: The role of multiple relationships. Merrill Palmer Quarterly, 56(3), 303-332.   

Graziano, P., Reavis, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (2007). The role of emotion regulation and the student-teacher relationship in children’s academic success.  Journal of School Psychology, 45, 3-19.   

Reavis, R., & Zakriski, A. (2005). Are home-schooled children socially at-risk or socially protected? Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Newsletter, 21(9), 1-5.     

Conference Presentations (Undergraduate co-authors are marked by an asterisk.)

Reavis, R., Miller, S., Kasikci, K.*, Webb, A.*, Galperin, O.*, Kenny, S.*, Hampp, A.*, & Flores, L.* (October, 2015). Sibling relationships and delay of gratification. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Cognitive Development, held in Columbus, OH, October 2015.

Neilsen, B., Miller, S., & Reavis, R. (October, 2015). Thoughtful friends: The relationship between friendship quality, executive function, and responses to friendship transgressions. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Cognitive Development, held in Columbus, OH, October 2015.

Galperin, O.*, Reavis, R., Miller, S., Lewis, G.*, Tierney, M.*, & Nielsen, B. (March, 2015). Gender differences in Theory of Mind and peer relationships. Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, held in Philadelphia, March 2015.

Nielsen, B., Welch, C., Miller, S., & Reavis, R. (March, 2015). The relationship between executive function, friendship quality, and responses to friendship transgressions. Poster presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, held in Philadelphia, March 2015.

Reavis, R., Sage, M.*, Onunkwo, A.*, & Ebbs, J.* (February, 2015). Self-affirmation and vaccine safety messages. Poster presented at the 2015 biennial meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Long Beach, California.

Reavis, R., & Keane, S. (April, 2013). Withdrawal, aggression, and gender predict trajectories of peer-reported peer victimization across elementary school. Presented at 2013 meeting of the Society for Research on Child Development, Seattle, Washington.

Reavis, R., Donohue*, L., & Berke-Williams*, E. (May, 2012). Daily experiences of negative peer treatment, peer help, and emotion. Poster presented at the 2012 meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago, IL.   

Gomez*, C., Jiménez*, J., & Reavis, R. (May, 2011). Who is a friend? Associations between friendship classification and socioemotional adjustment. Poster presented at the 2011 meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.   

Reavis, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (March, 2010). Predicting changes in responses to peer provocation from childhood to pre-adolescence. Poster presented at the 2010 meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, Philadelphia, PA.   

Mendes*, A., Reavis, R., Kelleher, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (March, 2010).  Predicting aggression: Moderating effects of maternal AD/HD and vagal regulation.  Poster presented at the Undergraduate  Research Expo at The University of North Carolina Greensboro.     

Zdravkovic, A., Reavis, R., Moore, J., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (November, 2009). The combined effects of negative parenting and peer victimization on child hostile attribution bias. Poster presented at the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy Annual Conference in New York City, NY.   

Mendes*, A., Reavis, R.,  Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (November, 2009). Predicting ODD/CD: Moderating and mediating effects of maternal depression, emotion regulation, and peer rejection.  Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research & Creativity Symposium at The University of North Carolina Wilmington.    

Dixon*, B., & Reavis, R. (May, 2009). AD/HD, academic achievement, and social maladjustment: Role of informant. Paper presented at the 2009 UNCG Research Excellence Conference.    

Reavis, R., Shuey, E., & Keane, S. (April, 2009). Peer victimization, friendship, and the self: Views from children and their friends. Poster presented at the 2009 meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Denver, CO.   

Reavis, R., Shuey, E., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (May, 2008).  Trajectories of peer nominated aggressive behavior: The role of peer victimization and friendship.  Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science.   

Shuey, E., Reavis, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (May, 2008). Trajectories of externalizing and peer liking across early elementary school.  Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago, IL.   

Graziano, P., Moore, J., Reavis, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (April, 2008).  Temperament and children’s academic competence: The moderating role of socioeconomic status.  Poster presented at the biannual Conference on Human Development, Indianapolis, IN.   

Reavis, R., Zdravkovic, A., Shuey, E., Keane, S., Calkins, S., & O’Brien, M. (April, 2008).  Peer victimization and hostile attributions: The protective role of friendships.  Paper presented at the biannual Conference on Human Development, Indianapolis, IN.   

Shuey, E., Lawson, E., Reavis, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (April, 2008).  Self-perceived competence with peers, peer liking, and problem behaviors.  Paper presented at the biannual Conference on Human Development, Indianapolis, IN.   

Reavis, R., Graziano, P., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (May, 2007).  The role of the student-teacher relationship in promoting emotion regulation and decreasing maladaptive behavior.  Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, DC.   

Shuey, E., Keane, S., Reavis, R., & Calkins, S. (March, 2007).  Maternal responses to children’s negative emotions, parenting style, and kindergarten peer acceptance.  Presented at the 2007 meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Boston, MA.   

Reavis, R., Shuey, E., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (April, 2006).  Predicting change in peer rejection.  Poster presented at the Conference on Human Development, Louisville, Kentucky.   

Reavis, R., & Keane, S. (September, 2005). Predicting early peer acceptance from toddler peer behavior. Paper presented at the 2005 Graduate Research Colloquium at UNCG.    

Graziano, P., Reavis, R., Keane, S., & Calkins, S. (August, 2005). The role of emotion regulation and the student-teacher relationship in children’s academic success. Presented at the 2005 meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.   

Reavis, R., & Zakriski, A. (April, 2005). Peer relations of home-schooled and traditionally schooled children. Presented at the 2005 meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Atlanta, GA.

Society for Research in Child Development
Association for Psychological Science
Society for Teaching of Psychology (APA Division 2)
Developmental Psychology (APA Division 7)

I found my experience at a small liberal arts school to be rewarding and beneficial, and I wanted to spend my career in a similar environment. Earlham's focus on teaching quality and its broader values (Principles & Practices) closely match my own values. Two of my close friends attended Earlham as undergraduates and enjoyed their experiences. Once I decided to pursue college teaching as a career, I put Earlham on my short-list of ideal places to teach. As luck would have it, a job opened in my last year of graduate school, and I was able to join the faculty here.

My department has allowed me to follow my interests and to teach classes that I'm passionate about. They have also encouraged my interest in new areas and in developing new courses. This approach benefits students in a number of ways. As I pursue new avenues of scholarship, I involve students in the process and show them that learning is a life-long process and that I am as much learner as I am teacher. Students in the classroom benefit from passionate and engaged professors who expose students to recent and cutting-edge developments.   Teaching at Earlham has been and continues to be a rewarding experience.

I hesitate to attempt to describe Earlham students, who are a diverse group of people, in terms of background, race, religion, interests, personality, among many other characteristics. On numerous occasions, I have walked into a classroom and heard three or more languages being spoken. Talking to students, reading The Word, and attending events on campus reveal an engaged student body, with different interests and pursuits. I enjoy seeing students participate in extracurricular activities, including athletics, music, and dance. A student may be quiet and unassuming in class, but animated on the stage or intense on the field. I am constantly reminded that not only is the Earlham student body too diverse to describe accurately, but also that individual students have many facets that make even individual descriptions difficult.

Each semester, I have 4-6 students in my research lab. Students have been primarily involved in three main projects.

The now-completed Peer Project examined the role of friends and bystanders in peer victimization. Students helped conduct classroom and individual phone interviews with children in 5th, 6th, & 7th grades. We asked children about their friendships, emotional states, and daily peer experiences. Two students helped co-author a paper in the journal Social Development.

The Thoughtful Friends Study is an ongoing project in the lab, which examines the overlap between cognitive development and friendship in 7- to 9-year-old children and college-age adults. We are examining executive functioning (the ability to plan and control attention), theory of mind (the ability to recognize other's perspectives), friendship quality, and conflict resolution skills.

The third main project focuses on Carol Dweck's work on mindset -- how we think about abilities and effort. We are investigating the effect of praise on mindset and other outcomes (enjoyment, persistence) in adults and children. We have partnered with the Joseph Moore Museum on Earlham's campus to conduct the mindset study. Students recruit participants at the Joseph Moore Museum and teach children about neurons and the importance of challenge and effort to learning.

Finally, my lab conducts smaller projects based on changing student and professor interests. Students have helped author a manuscript examining the effect of a psychological intervention on parents' intent to vaccinate. Students have also worked on a project that examined the role of siblings in delaying gratification, among other projects.

I enjoy reading and tend to read more non-fiction than fiction, and particularly enjoy off-beat topics. Mary Roach is one of my favorite authors. I also enjoy spending time outdoors and camping, but I don't do it nearly as often as I would like. Watching TV — current and past — is something I do with more frequency than I probably should. Mad Men, Breaking Bad, and The Sopranos are among my favorite shows. Finally, doing crafts with my family is also a favorite Saturday activity.

Print Friendly and PDF