Contact Info

Campus Mail
Drawer 172

Phone
765-983-1451

E-mail
thomama@earlham.edu

Office
302 Landrum Bolling Center

Office Hours
By appointment

Maggie Thomas

Assistant Professor of Psychology


Programs/Departments

  • Psychology
  • Women's, Gender, Sexuality Studies

Degrees

  • Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
  • M.S., Pennsylvania State University
  • B.A., Lawrence University


Selected Courses

Introduction to Psychology, Social Psychology, Psychology of Prejudice, Psychology of Women, Human Sexuality, Psychology of Food, Psychology of Sustainability, Human-Animal Interactions, and Comprehensive Research Project.

Biography

Maggie Thomas teaches a wide variety of courses in psychology. Her scholarly work is focused on prejudice and stereotyping. Every semester, Maggie has two-four student assistants who are involved in all aspects of her research projects.

Of her decision to teach at Earlham, Maggie says, “although many schools talk about issues of social justice, Earlham's faculty, staff, and students are actively engaged in working on issues of social justice. We talk the talk and do our best to walk the walk,” she says.

Research Projects

Currently, I am working on a variety of research projects, all of which are broadly rooted within the framework of research on stereotyping and prejudice. Two of my current projects are as follows: 1. Investigating whether an individual's bodily performance of gender (through posture) affects how others perceive that individual's gender as well as how the individual perceives her/his own gender. Currently, my colleague and I have found that bodily performance of gender does affect perceptions of gender in others. 2. Assessing how human attitudes toward non-human animals affects emotional and behavioral responses toward non-human animals. My research in this area indicates that humans view non-human animals on the basis of competence and warmth, and that human's emotional and behavioral responses vary dramatically based on how they categorize an animal. 3. Investigating how language affects perceptions of group members. In this area, I am investigating how group labels affect perceptions of group members when that group has multiple labels (e.g., "Black" and "African-American" generally refer to the same group).

Professional Memberships

Association for Psychological Science

Society for the Teaching of Psychology (APA Division 2) 

Society for Personality and Social Psychology (APA Division 8) 

Society for the Psychology of Women (APA Division 35)

Print Friendly and PDF